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Posts Tagged ‘training’

Now that the cross season is winding down, what are most of you guys doing to keep fit with snow right around the corner?

We all know about weight training and indoor trainers/spin classes, wbut what else is out there? Is running even an option? What about rowing machines? I hear those are intense, but pretty expensive

It would be nice to have something like a Surly Pugsley, and just be able to float on top of the snow and still pedal.

surly puglsey

Big Wheels ๐Ÿ˜ฎ

As much fun as this would be, being on the bike year round can possibly be a deal breaker, and potentially lower your interest for riding midway through your next season.

Who has time to start a new off season hobby though? Cycling is expensive enough, what is it like trying to pick up a second sport that helps with the cardio aspect during the winter? I’m tempted to get a pair of skis, and while I’m hoping it isn’t that expensive, I still know it is going to cost more than a pair of running shoes.

Hiking! Even Chris Carmichael believes that this one is a winner. In his book, Time Crunched Cyclist, he states:

Cover of

Cover via Amazon

But, you say, you’re a cyclist, and you’ve made the choice to focus on the sport you love. That’s great, but more well-rounded fitness gives you more options for activities and adventures and won’t take anything away from your abilities on the bike. I live at the foot of Pikes Peak, and I know cyclists who have lived here for a decade yet have not experienced the sense of accomplishment and wonder that comes from hiking to the summit. It’s not a particularly difficult climb; in fact, it is conquered every year by thousands of out-of-shape tourists. But it’s a nearly impossible challenge for highly specialized cyclists because the 13-mile trail is too hard on their feet and hips, and they struggle under the weight of packs if they choose to turn the adventure into a 2-day camping trip. I’m all for maximizing sport-specific performance, but unless you’re making a living as a cyclist, I also believe that the benefits of nonspecific fitness are worth pursuing.

Okay readers, tell me what you are going to do this off-season, and for what duration/intensity?

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Told ‘ya I felt bad for not posting as often. here is a photo of our local B-Group ride, and a bit of footage to satiate your appetite for media.

Fat Tiree Cycle, WV, USA, West Virginia, Buckhannon, Upshur County, 26201, road bike, cycling, wvcycling, wvcycling.net

So many bikes in one location ๐Ÿ˜ฎ

This footage is pretty typical (except for the Lady Gaga; I don’t know what was up with that…) for our beginner/B-group rides on Monday afternoons. The pace is pretty leisurely while riding by the river, but can vary depending all on who is there, how everyone is feeling, or if we feel like pacelining. These are your typical, but not boring no-drop rides.

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Training has come a long way for cycling since the first race in May 31, 1868 at the Parc de Saint-Cloud, Paris. The primary training method for years was based on volume and intensity.

Volume riding is the amount of riding you would do. Intensity is a term to explain how hard you ride or train; think about high rates of perceived efforts. Typically high volume riding involved long rides without major wattage output on the off season, or on days you were not racing. As your training continues, volume starts to decrease, and intensity increases. Trading off from volume and intensity has been the staple of almost any kind of endurance sport.

Later, starting at a time when I cannot pinpoint a certain date, a type of interval training became the norm. The different types of cycling training were broken down and performed one by one on a seperate day. Ex:

  • Monday – Rest
  • Tuesday – Long Rides
  • Wednesday – Climbing
  • Thursday – Race Training
  • Friday – Relax Ride
  • Saturday – Race
  • Sunday – Rest

These days cyclometers, heart rate monitors, power meters and other types of training measurement are available.We know know that rest is just as important as the racing and training itself. The usefulness of modern training has made professional racing more efficient. Less grueling training has to be done, and we are not seeing as many riders racing to train during the spring classics. Racers are recovering better (drugs or not) throughout the year, and are not all wasted by the time that off-season starts. (more…)

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What is it that has you on the trainer before/after work? Vanity? Health? Pride? Weight? Youth? Competitive Spirit? Giving in or avoiding other addictions?

I’m not a betting man… but I’ll put money that you want to be fit enough to earn a nickname from your friends this summer, and I don’t mean things like: Gramps, Fatty, (not you! ๐Ÿ˜›), Bricks McGee either. (more…)

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Today’s post is an interview with a LBS in Buckhannon, WV: Fat Tire Cycle with owner Gene Wells.

Gene Wells is well… a swell guy (see what I did there?) He is active in many aspects of his community as a business person should, but you can also tell he cares about everything he does. He can also kick most of the people in town’s butt in speed and distance on a bike, yet he chooses not to. (sometimes!)

(I’ll let you know before this interview gets through that he is my main mechanic, I was sponsored by him during my tenure as President of the Cycling Club/Team at West Virginia Wesleyan College with the standard collegiate store discount. I have also purchased a pretty sweet rig from him, my ’09 Gary Fisher Cobia. All in all, we have a pretty good relationship by means of business and also friendship.)


With that out-of-the-way, let’s get to the Q&A!

1.) First of all, tell us about your history, how did you get into cycling?

Well, I got into cycling in 1972. I was doing a lot of cross-country racing, and touring in the area around Pleasantville, Pennsylvania. I remember getting my first road bike in that town in 1973. (more…)

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