Feeds:
Posts
Comments

Posts Tagged ‘Features’

Flit Wheels stated this about their Letica wheelset:

The FLIT Letica wheelset is built from the ground up to provide a high performance lightweight pair of wheels. Great for everyday riding but engineered for fast-pace group rides/races, this wheelset outperforms wheels in its class. With its outstanding light weight at 1315g, the FLIT Letica climbs like a rocket and nimbly accelerates to win the field sprint. Not only is weight a focus for these wheels, durability is also a priority. This is addressed by a plethora of spokes, specifically 20 in the front and 28 laced 2x/2x in the rear. Spoke tension is also evened by using thicker spokes on the drive side. Like all FLIT wheels, this wheelset is proudly hand built in the U.S.A.

  • Rim: Flit Aluminum Clincher
  • Rim Depth: 22mm
  • Spoke Count: 20Front/28Rear
  • Hubs: Flit SL hubs
  • Hub Spacing: 100mm Front/130mm Rear
  • Spokes:
  • Front: Wheelsmith XL14
  • Rear: Wheelsmith XL14(non-drive side) Wheelsmith DB14(drive side)
  • Sapim CX-Ray Option available
  • Lacing: Radial Front and 2x/2x Rear
  • Nipples: Flit External Alloy Nipples
  • Weight: 1315 grams

This review are for the Flit Leticas with the Sapim CX-Ray spoke upgrade. Shimano, SRAM or Campagnolo Compatibility

MSRP – $538 (as of 5/30/2009)

Flit is a company owned by Brent Delrosario. Brent is a Michigan native, and also a racer with the Wolverine Sports Club. His business, according to an interview with Tim Finkelstein was started in order to provide light, and quality track wheels to friends, young racers and (employee) track starlet whom is only named Maia at a lower price than what is out on the market. Brent declares that

Flit Wheels are not intended as a main project, nor for him to become the next Donald Trump… (more…)

Read Full Post »

I love the idea of bike camping, cyclocamping, velocamping, or whatever you want to call it. I’ve even bought special gear to go out and ride as far as I want to and settle down for the night. The only problem is that I’ve only gone out a few times.

It not because I am not experienced at camping, nor is it that there is a lack of places I could set up camp at… it’s just camping isn’t fun all by yourself. And really… who the hell wants to just go ride somewhere with twenty or thirty pounds of supplies so you can sleep on the ground and cook hot dogs.

Bringing people creates comradely and great stories  This post is becoming Grant Peterson’s wet dream in the making. Proof of this Here and Here.

Surprisingly enough there are a lot of sites with sections dedicated to bike camping. These dudes are pretty extreme. I chatted it up with a few of them a few years ago. They have logged many hours and miles doing things like this. Like I said, I’m savvy and interested… but still wet behind the ears. Some people live out on their bikes with camping supplies enough to be misjudged as homeless folk. Seriously, and they love it. I don’t think I want to be one of these guys either. I just want to be able to bring an overnight backpack and be able to drink and chill with some friends.

Take a look at how many places there are around here:

(more…)

Read Full Post »

After living in West Virginia for five years after residing in Virginia Beach and other larger metro areas, I have slowly started appreciating what is all around me this whole time.

For a cyclist, West Virginia is paradise. This state is not completely full of toothless hicks that bootleg alcohol like a certain ham shammy commercials would like you to believe. There are genuine people who really appreciate this beautiful, engaging land and make sure it’s majesty is preserved for future generations.

The abundance of state and national parks make it an easy ride to get to one, even just on bicycle. I don’t think BikeSnobNYC would be as grumpy, grizzled, or sarcastic if he didn’t have to encounter so many hipsters and was able to freely ride around all over the place.

The West Virginia Department of Highways claims to be in charge of 34,000 miles of road in this state. With an operating budget of $400,000,000 (Four-Hundred Million Dollars) in 2009, this means they spend an average of $2.22 per foot-length of road in the state. That is a fair amount, I think.

Look at that smooth blacktop ❤

While cycling data and reviews of the road quality were not as empirically defined as I like, Motorcycleroads.com had a very clear and well defined system for reviewing their road-trip areas. Take a look at their site, and you can see (I averaged all of the reviews together) that they review West Virginia’s road systems by three points of interest. (more…)

Read Full Post »

%d bloggers like this: