Feeds:
Posts
Comments

Posts Tagged ‘clothing’

This review consists of a double review from two WV Cycling contributors, with their opinions and statements placed distinctly throughout the post.

Product Review: O2 Rainwear 3Flow Jacket

Product Description from O2 Rainwear:

“O2 Rainwear’s 3Flow™ Performance Series is designed for the serious cyclist who won’t be detoured by the elements, yet is versatile and affordable enough to attract anyone who rides a bike. This higher-end gear is Waterproof, Breathable, and Windproof. Jacket includes pit zips, a back pocket for storage, a drop-tail for road spray protection, a built-in hood around the collar, and is seam sealed. Constructed with 3Flow™ Performance Fabric.

Rain Shield, Inc. is a Minnesota-based company founded in 1997. Rain Shield’s objective is creating O2 branded rainwear from microporous film. O2 Rainwear™ is making waterproof and breathable rainwear much more affordable than it ever has been in the past. Rain Shield is continually pursuing new uses of the innovative Microporous Film.

O2 Rainwear Microporous Film is a very inexpensive, yet high-performance laminate that has the best combination of water holdout and breathability of any fabric on the market today. Our Microporous Film is thin and lightweight, making O2 Rainwear™ easy to pack and for people to bring with the them. But the greatest aspect of Rain Shield, Inc.’s O2 Rainwear™ is its affordability – allowing people to experience this outstanding comfort and protection at the same price as non-breathable, rubber, plastic, and PVC-coated garments. No Wet, No Sweat! We have a continuously expanding line of the O2 branded rain jackets, rain suits, and bibs. We can also decorate our garments with waterproof embroidery and special packaging for ASI and promotional applications. Please check out our Product Catalog to see what the best product is for such activities.

The use of polypropylene was a key factor because it is very inexpensive compared to materials used for brand-named waterproof and breathable membranes, such as Teflon and polyurethane.

By 1987, the process for making the polypropylene membrane was perfected as it achieved the same levels of water hold-out and breathability found in more expensive garments.”

Review:

(Reviewer 1)

The rain jacket held up to my expectations. I previously wore a rain jacket that seemed to allow water to seep into the jacket and into the back of my shorts. When I wore this jacket during our rainy ride, I was very satisfied. My backside was kept dry and the jacket seemed to have good moisture-wicking properties. It didn’t seem to ‘stick’ to my skin, when I began to get warmer on the inclines. I felt comfortable in this jacket because the fit was not restraining in any sense on or off the bike. Really, it was like a second layer of skin that kept me dry!

(Reviewer 2)

What most impressed me about this jacket other than it being manufactured in America (Minneapolis, Minnesota?), was that every stitch, seam, and hem is sealed with a thin plastic layer that has been either chemically or sonically bonded with the rest of the interior of the jacket. This prevents all of the stitches to allow water intrusion. The jacket comes clean very easily, and has not needed a true laundry washing after seventeen rain-rides. The zip-up vents in the armpits are a bit small, but suffice when needed. My only complaint is how binding the neck portion of the collar is when completely zipped while the hood is concealed. This was not comfortable, and I was tempted to cut out the hood. I also really appreciated the mesh kangaroo pocket in the back. Even with a zipper, things stayed dry from the outside, while did not absorb ample  amounts of sweat either. The jacket can also be rolled up moderately tight, and stuck into its own pocket, or rubber banded small enough to fit into one of your rear jersey pockets. Very convenient.

Summary:

O2 Rainwear has created a quality product in America that is competitively priced, while performing better than other jackets in the same price range. The fit is accurate for its size, and works well on a man or woman. Rain has nowhere to enter on this jacket, while sweat does seem to escape better than other products in the same price range, or higher.

Even without my bias for American made products, I give this product 4.5 out of 5 stars.

Photos:

Clothing, Minnesota, Waterproofing, United States, Raincoat, Waterproof fabric, Polytetrafluoroethylene, Polyvinyl chloride, minneapolis, fixed gear, rain coat, rain jacket, waterproof cycling clothes, waterproof bike jacket, bike jacket, zip up jersey, hooded jersey, kangaroo pocket, bike jersey, waterproof bike jersey, waterproof cycling jersey, waterproof cycling jacket, waterproof cycling raincoat,

Collar is not comfortable to zip to the very top when hood is concealed/bunched up.

Clothing, Minnesota, Waterproofing, United States, Raincoat, Waterproof fabric, Polytetrafluoroethylene, Polyvinyl chloride, minneapolis, fixed gear, rain coat, rain jacket, waterproof cycling clothes, waterproof bike jacket, bike jacket, zip up jersey, hooded jersey, kangaroo pocket, bike jersey, waterproof bike jersey, waterproof cycling jersey, waterproof cycling jacket, waterproof cycling raincoat,

Covers the rear well

 

Clothing, Minnesota, Waterproofing, United States, Raincoat, Waterproof fabric, Polytetrafluoroethylene, Polyvinyl chloride, minneapolis, fixed gear, rain coat, rain jacket, waterproof cycling clothes, waterproof bike jacket, bike jacket, zip up jersey, hooded jersey, kangaroo pocket, bike jersey, waterproof bike jersey, waterproof cycling jersey, waterproof cycling jacket, waterproof cycling raincoat,

Reflective piping all over the jacket, along with reflective logos.

 

Clothing, Minnesota, Waterproofing, United States, Raincoat, Waterproof fabric, Polytetrafluoroethylene, Polyvinyl chloride, minneapolis, fixed gear, rain coat, rain jacket, waterproof cycling clothes, waterproof bike jacket, bike jacket, zip up jersey, hooded jersey, kangaroo pocket, bike jersey, waterproof bike jersey, waterproof cycling jersey, waterproof cycling jacket, waterproof cycling raincoat,

On the bike, still covers the rear.

 

Clothing, Minnesota, Waterproofing, United States, Raincoat, Waterproof fabric, Polytetrafluoroethylene, Polyvinyl chloride, minneapolis, fixed gear, rain coat, rain jacket, waterproof cycling clothes, waterproof bike jacket, bike jacket, zip up jersey, hooded jersey, kangaroo pocket, bike jersey, waterproof bike jersey, waterproof cycling jersey, waterproof cycling jacket, waterproof cycling raincoat,

Typical riding position, still great coverage.

Read Full Post »

With Hurricane Earl bringing a taste of fall, it made me contemplate my current cycling wardrobe setup… Because you know, cyclists don’t think about these kinds of things… It’s not like we’re overly self-conscious or anything…

I have a basic formula that I can work with that covers a 25*c temperature variance. This can be accomplished with only six pieces of cycling clothes, excluding gloves/head & face warmers.

  • Warm Weather  21*C+
  • Cool Weather 15 – 21*C
  • Cooler Weather 12 – 15*C
  • Cold Weather 7 – 12*C
  • Why are you outside? -1 – 7*C
  • Below Freezing, you won’t see me on a bike very often. I don’t even really have a plan for this…

Warm Weather gear is pretty obvious, and everyone has it. Bibs, Jersey, Gloves. What else do you need?

Jersey bibs illustration warm hot weather cycling clothes

Cool Weather clothes are what I tend to use right before I pull out the tights. Typically, you can go 2-3*C cooler with this setup, but your knees may or may not like you. Use some embro while you are at it. The underarmour/base layer is key in keeping you warm, while still not getting super-sweaty. I found some base layers at Wal-Mart/Target that were under $15, and work just as well as anything else.

Jersey bibs underarmour illustration Cool weather cycling clothes

My Cooler Weather kit is nearly the same as the Cool Weather setup, but now that it is below 15*C, the padded bib tights come are used. These will keep the chill out of your legs, if they do not… you are not pedaling hard enough/need to HTFU. At this temperature, you are probably going to want to bust out a pair of long fingered gloves.

Jersey bib tights underarmour illustration cool cooler weather cycling clothes

The Cold Weather gear is when things get real. It is cold outside; cross riders are questioning whether it is worth being outside or not… heck… the trainer/rollers are starting to look nice at this temperature. Time to bust out the ear warmers, the gloves, the shoe covers/toe covers, and maybe even embrocate while wearing tights… Sounds crazy, but I have heard of people doing such things… The wind vest is essential at this temperature. Layering gives you the option to zip articles up and down, or take things off if the weather changes mid-ride… Having something protect your chest from all of that cold wind really gives you an edge, as compared to wearing a second jersey or something. Maneuverability is not yet compromised.

Jersey bibs illustration cold weather cycling clothes jacket long sleeve wind vest bib tights

Do I even need to tell you what to wear if it gets any colder than 7*C outside? Why would you even want to ride in this kind of weather when you could be on the Kreitler, watching Scrubs, or American Idol, or whatever people watch these days… What I suggest you to do is take an arm load of your cycling clothes, and throw them, one by one into a basket. Whatever lands in it; you wear it. Simple as that. I really have no suggestions for below freezing, or nearly freezing weather. I seldom ride in these conditions, since I am from the beach originally, and would be a hypocrite to suggest you to.

Jersey bibs illustration cold weather cycling clothes jacket long sleeve wind vest bib tights

Yes, all of these were somewhat handmade illustrations by yours truly~

What provoked me to start posting about clothing? Mostly the side effects of Hurricane Earl. Cool weather from the West was pulled to the East, and we caught a lot of it. I think it was 18*C when I left my house for a MTB ride, and was 15*C by the time I got back.

Summer has ended. Earl has shown me what is in our immediate future, in terms of weather…. 😦

Read Full Post »

Original Post

This post isn’t a newbie asking why lycra and chamois pads are important. This is more along the lines of the social/cultural aspects of cycling clothes.I am not a disbeliever in cycling kits. Not including my two sets of shoes, I have about $500+ in clothes. The garments are typically expensive, and sadly they do get exponentially better when you reach that $50 for a pair of shorts level. I also do not ride exclusively in cycling clothes. I am not afraid of pedaling along in jeans and t-shirt around town or to go to the store. After maybe three or four months of trying to use some of my already owned performance clothing used for running or other sports, I found out some of these pieces just didn’t cut it. Gym shorts will not suit you for a thirty mile ride or more if you don’t want saddle sores or crotch rub.  With that said, you can clearly take me out of Grant Peterson’s side of the Venn diagram.     

I have many issues with the clothing in this statement for cycling use. I wouldn’t have a problem with wearing such clothing (if it didn’t look like it was two or three sizes too large on the person) as long as we aren’t talking more than ten miles. Call it a luxury, call it habit, or even call it weakness, but I see no sense in wearing clothes that will get and stay dirty or eventually be uncomfortable on a ride. (more…)

Read Full Post »

%d bloggers like this: