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Posts Tagged ‘bib tights’

With Hurricane Earl bringing a taste of fall, it made me contemplate my current cycling wardrobe setup… Because you know, cyclists don’t think about these kinds of things… It’s not like we’re overly self-conscious or anything…

I have a basic formula that I can work with that covers a 25*c temperature variance. This can be accomplished with only six pieces of cycling clothes, excluding gloves/head & face warmers.

  • Warm Weather  21*C+
  • Cool Weather 15 – 21*C
  • Cooler Weather 12 – 15*C
  • Cold Weather 7 – 12*C
  • Why are you outside? -1 – 7*C
  • Below Freezing, you won’t see me on a bike very often. I don’t even really have a plan for this…

Warm Weather gear is pretty obvious, and everyone has it. Bibs, Jersey, Gloves. What else do you need?

Jersey bibs illustration warm hot weather cycling clothes

Cool Weather clothes are what I tend to use right before I pull out the tights. Typically, you can go 2-3*C cooler with this setup, but your knees may or may not like you. Use some embro while you are at it. The underarmour/base layer is key in keeping you warm, while still not getting super-sweaty. I found some base layers at Wal-Mart/Target that were under $15, and work just as well as anything else.

Jersey bibs underarmour illustration Cool weather cycling clothes

My Cooler Weather kit is nearly the same as the Cool Weather setup, but now that it is below 15*C, the padded bib tights come are used. These will keep the chill out of your legs, if they do not… you are not pedaling hard enough/need to HTFU. At this temperature, you are probably going to want to bust out a pair of long fingered gloves.

Jersey bib tights underarmour illustration cool cooler weather cycling clothes

The Cold Weather gear is when things get real. It is cold outside; cross riders are questioning whether it is worth being outside or not… heck… the trainer/rollers are starting to look nice at this temperature. Time to bust out the ear warmers, the gloves, the shoe covers/toe covers, and maybe even embrocate while wearing tights… Sounds crazy, but I have heard of people doing such things… The wind vest is essential at this temperature. Layering gives you the option to zip articles up and down, or take things off if the weather changes mid-ride… Having something protect your chest from all of that cold wind really gives you an edge, as compared to wearing a second jersey or something. Maneuverability is not yet compromised.

Jersey bibs illustration cold weather cycling clothes jacket long sleeve wind vest bib tights

Do I even need to tell you what to wear if it gets any colder than 7*C outside? Why would you even want to ride in this kind of weather when you could be on the Kreitler, watching Scrubs, or American Idol, or whatever people watch these days… What I suggest you to do is take an arm load of your cycling clothes, and throw them, one by one into a basket. Whatever lands in it; you wear it. Simple as that. I really have no suggestions for below freezing, or nearly freezing weather. I seldom ride in these conditions, since I am from the beach originally, and would be a hypocrite to suggest you to.

Jersey bibs illustration cold weather cycling clothes jacket long sleeve wind vest bib tights

Yes, all of these were somewhat handmade illustrations by yours truly~

What provoked me to start posting about clothing? Mostly the side effects of Hurricane Earl. Cool weather from the West was pulled to the East, and we caught a lot of it. I think it was 18*C when I left my house for a MTB ride, and was 15*C by the time I got back.

Summer has ended. Earl has shown me what is in our immediate future, in terms of weather…. 😦

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This post isn’t a newbie asking why lycra and chamois pads are important. This is more along the lines of the social/cultural aspects of cycling clothes.I am not a disbeliever in cycling kits. Not including my two sets of shoes, I have about $500+ in clothes. The garments are typically expensive, and sadly they do get exponentially better when you reach that $50 for a pair of shorts level. I also do not ride exclusively in cycling clothes. I am not afraid of pedaling along in jeans and t-shirt around town or to go to the store. After maybe three or four months of trying to use some of my already owned performance clothing used for running or other sports, I found out some of these pieces just didn’t cut it. Gym shorts will not suit you for a thirty mile ride or more if you don’t want saddle sores or crotch rub.  With that said, you can clearly take me out of Grant Peterson’s side of the Venn diagram.     

I have many issues with the clothing in this statement for cycling use. I wouldn’t have a problem with wearing such clothing (if it didn’t look like it was two or three sizes too large on the person) as long as we aren’t talking more than ten miles. Call it a luxury, call it habit, or even call it weakness, but I see no sense in wearing clothes that will get and stay dirty or eventually be uncomfortable on a ride. (more…)

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Its the first day in over a month without snow coming down, the car snot is clearing off of the slushy roads. The giant bank LCD screen says that it is 40*F outside.

You want to ride.

Today is that day – You get off work and start calculating how much time you have until it gets dark. You know that you just finished putting on new cables, housing, and bar tape and want to try out the shifting on the road. You’re tired of your trainer, and the treadmill feels like a jail cell with a belt underneath you.

Time to ride. (more…)

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