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Well, first snow has fallen, so it is another round of trying the snow chains. This year, I have scrapped the external tensioning wire on both sides, saving about 120g,  and the install takes less than 20 minutes for both wheels:

DIY | Tagged 700c, better traction, bicycle, bicycle on ice, bicycle snow, bicycle snow chain, bicycle snow chain diy, bicycle snow chains, bicycle tire chains, bike chains snow riding, bike snow chain, bike snow chains, brake, carbide, chain, continental, disc, DIY, how to make bike tire chains, howto, ice, icebike, innova, Mountain, mountain bike snow chains, mtn, nokian, people slipping on ice, peter white, peterwhitecycles, Pneus à crampons, road bike snow chains, schwalbe, slipping on ice, snow, snow bicycle, snow chain bicycle, snow chain bike, snow chains bicycle, snowchains bicycle, stud, studded, teeth, tire, Video, weather, zip ties, Ziptie

Before

DIY | Tagged 700c, better traction, bicycle, bicycle on ice, bicycle snow, bicycle snow chain, bicycle snow chain diy, bicycle snow chains, bicycle tire chains, bike chains snow riding, bike snow chain, bike snow chains, brake, carbide, chain, continental, disc, DIY, how to make bike tire chains, howto, ice, icebike, innova, Mountain, mountain bike snow chains, mtn, nokian, people slipping on ice, peter white, peterwhitecycles, Pneus à crampons, road bike snow chains, schwalbe, slipping on ice, snow, snow bicycle, snow chain bicycle, snow chain bike, snow chains bicycle, snowchains bicycle, stud, studded, teeth, tire, Video, weather, zip ties, Ziptie

After

The only change I noticed in having the chains being held in place by zip ties alone was that the tension needed to hold them in place created unneeded stress on the sidewalls of the tires. One of the chains where the entire link was not fully aligned ended up rubbing a hole into my rear tire, ending the ride prematurely.

I stopped here for a photo op, and to let the tubeless goo seal the hole:

DIY | Tagged 700c, better traction, bicycle, bicycle on ice, bicycle snow, bicycle snow chain, bicycle snow chain diy, bicycle snow chains, bicycle tire chains, bike chains snow riding, bike snow chain, bike snow chains, brake, carbide, chain, continental, disc, DIY, how to make bike tire chains, howto, ice, icebike, innova, Mountain, mountain bike snow chains, mtn, nokian, people slipping on ice, peter white, peterwhitecycles, Pneus à crampons, road bike snow chains, schwalbe, slipping on ice, snow, snow bicycle, snow chain bicycle, snow chain bike, snow chains bicycle, snowchains bicycle, stud, studded, teeth, tire, Video, weather, zip ties, Ziptie

Click for larger image

One last photo really shows how cold it was outside; all of the grit and water that flew up onto my frame froze. This created an impenetrable fortress of frozen gunk on the bottom side of the downtube:

DIY | Tagged 700c, better traction, bicycle, bicycle on ice, bicycle snow, bicycle snow chain, bicycle snow chain diy, bicycle snow chains, bicycle tire chains, bike chains snow riding, bike snow chain, bike snow chains, brake, carbide, chain, continental, disc, DIY, how to make bike tire chains, howto, ice, icebike, innova, Mountain, mountain bike snow chains, mtn, nokian, people slipping on ice, peter white, peterwhitecycles, Pneus à crampons, road bike snow chains, schwalbe, slipping on ice, snow, snow bicycle, snow chain bicycle, snow chain bike, snow chains bicycle, snowchains bicycle, stud, studded, teeth, tire, Video, weather, zip ties, Ziptie

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Are you ready to give the finger to Park Tools or Feedback Sports for their repair stands costing about 30% more than they should?

Well, give them the finger by spending your hard earned cash on making a functional repair stand by yourself. I have made two different kinds of repair stands, and both work phenomenally well. I just love to tinker and build things; it’s so fun.

I looked for weeks, and maybe months in my spare time figuring out how I could find a premade tripod or equivalent type of structure that could be used as a repair stand. I was very tempted in buying an outdoor construction worklight tripod off of craigslist or something, ditch or sell the lights, and work from there.

bike repair stand

Luckily, I was able to find a post on a DIY blog that changed everything and simplified my ideas on how to create this DIY project. This idea was brewing in my head for maybe…. six months before I found this page; you wouldn’t understand how glad I was when I stumbled upon it.

All of the instructions on how to build this folding repair stand are included on his page. His photos detail the step by step plans on how to build it.

After everything, the repair stand costs about $40 to fabricate.

  • $20 for the Speaker Tripod off of ebay
  • $10 for the pony clamp/pipe clamp at a local hardware store
  • $7-10 for the pieces of pipe and connecting parts required.

I am pretty satisfied with the results, and might even paint my folding repair stand in pretty colors like afajarito did.

Now for the part that you are all waiting for, the photos:

DIY bike repair stand

diy bike repair stand

This repair stand can hold a bike from it’s seatlost or the top tube just like a typical repair stand could, it can also rotate and suspend the bike in wacky positions just like afajarito‘s blog shows. If you have a smaller sized bike, or mtb with a small opening in the front diamond, you may have problems holding the top tube correctly. With my 15.5″ Gary Fisher Cobia, I am able to clamp and hold the bike by the top tube, but it is not the easiest to hold the bike up to maneuver the clamp into position while lifting the bike in the air to do so. Do I have any hesitations or qualms about the design? Nope. Just make sure to get an iron tripod. My Aluminum one is very sturdy, but gives me the creeps on how the vertical supporting tube (1mm thick wall) sways a bit when the wind picks up.

Don’t be afraid of finding ways to build what you want or need. You may even enjoy it!

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I purchased a cold cathode kit and two latern batteries and wired it up to my steel bicycle. This light is ostentatious and really gets car’s attention. The whole setup took one hour, and $35 after shipping of the computer cathode kit.

Cathode Tube Off:

Cathode Tube On: (more…)

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Long story short, I was dissatisfied with just about every camera mount system available or on instructables or other DIY sites. I have tried helmet cam mounts. I have tried stem mounts. I have tried MANY handlebar mounts. Most were junk! I even went to Lowe’s three or four times for ideas. (Someone once told me: “Try finding answers outside of the comfort of your expertise.”) My first nontraditional mount involved worm gear clamps from the plumbing isle and a L-shaped corner brace mounted on the bottom side of my fork. It was nice, but with the mild vibrations and movement between the clamps, the brace bowing and wiggling, and the camera itself wiggling made it a mess. :( It was not a complete waste of time though. I really learned a lot about the angles at which the camera would film the best footage and a couple of other vital things necessary to make a camera mount.

What I found out is that it is necessary for the bike or your body to take the brunt of any force in order to dampen camera shake. This automatically meant some parts of the frame, and the bottom part of the fork were now out of the question. At this point, everyone is like LOL WHY DON’T YOU MOUNT IT TO YOUR HELMETS?????? (more…)

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I love the idea of bike camping, cyclocamping, velocamping, or whatever you want to call it. I’ve even bought special gear to go out and ride as far as I want to and settle down for the night. The only problem is that I’ve only gone out a few times.

It not because I am not experienced at camping, nor is it that there is a lack of places I could set up camp at… it’s just camping isn’t fun all by yourself. And really… who the hell wants to just go ride somewhere with twenty or thirty pounds of supplies so you can sleep on the ground and cook hot dogs.

Bringing people creates comradely and great stories  This post is becoming Grant Peterson’s wet dream in the making. Proof of this Here and Here.

Surprisingly enough there are a lot of sites with sections dedicated to bike camping. These dudes are pretty extreme. I chatted it up with a few of them a few years ago. They have logged many hours and miles doing things like this. Like I said, I’m savvy and interested… but still wet behind the ears. Some people live out on their bikes with camping supplies enough to be misjudged as homeless folk. Seriously, and they love it. I don’t think I want to be one of these guys either. I just want to be able to bring an overnight backpack and be able to drink and chill with some friends.

Take a look at how many places there are around here:

(more…)

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No more paying $80 for a 700c mountain bike studded tire.

No more worrying about falling or slipping on ice or snow.

No more excuses for gaining five pounds.

The game is up. I have you covered, and it will only cost you anywhere from a Hamilton to a Jackson ($10 – 20 for those who are not from the USA

Tools / Supplies Needed:

For a 700c Wheel:

  • 24 ft of Braided Cable. 1/16″ or 3/32″ (I’m sure picture frame wire will work too)
  • Braided Cable Clamps x 4 – two for each wheel
  • Chain
  • Zip Ties
  • Adjustable wrench or Crescent wrench
  • Needle nose pliers
  • Cable Cutter – I used an old pair of Bowden cable/housing cutters from my bike tools. You do have one, right?

Note: You will need a bike with disc brakes for this to work.

Step 1:

Measure your Braided Cable around the edge of where your wheel rim meets the tire. Clip with an extra 2″-4″ for clamping space.

Once you have this piece measured, cut three more pieces to this length.

Step 2:

Measure the length of chain needed to have the chain reach both sides of the rim. Mine were roughly 5.75″ with a 700 x 51/53 (2.1″) Tire. Clip either 32 or 64 sections depending on how spread apart you want the chain.

Step 3 (more…)

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The old saying that goes something like “You get what you pay for” no longer holds bearing in today’s world. Some so-called deals are legit, while others are clearly false. With the globe so interconnected and thousands of companies outsourcing the manufacturing of their products, some highly priced goods are no different from the bargains with many having been made in the same factory. How many times have you seen two items identical to each other in different instances being sold by two or more different companies? We all have. The bike industry (or any other industry) is full of product re-labeling.

This is not always a bad thing. Having products being available by discount stores that are the same products being made by a prestigious company benefit the penny pinchers as long as those products do not go to shit after a week or two. But what do you do if any manufacturer is not making a product you need? Do you give up and divert your attention elsewhere, or do you keep on trying with what resources you have?

If the product doesn’t do exactly what you want, then you have to live with it – even make excuses to yourself in extreme cases.. or go for another option… DIY. (more…)

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